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Journal of the Korean Child Neurology Society 1997;5(1):76-85.
Published online October 30, 1997.
Electroencephalographic Findings in Moyamoya Disease.
Jeong Ho Kim, Tae Sung Ko
Abstract
BACKGROUND: "Rebuild-up" phenomenon, induced by hyperventilation, is a characteristic finding on EEG in children with Moyamoya disease. Its mechanism, however, remains obscure. In this study, we examined the relationship between cerebral lesions on MRI, stenosis or occlusion of cerebral vessel on cerebral angiography, and EEG findings in children with Moyamoya disease. METHODS: We have reviewed medical records of 33 patients, who were confirmed as Moyamoya disease by cerebral angiography at Asan Medical Center. EEG and brain MRI were carried out in all subjects. RESULTS: 1) Epidemiologic data were : the male to female ratio was 1:1.1; highest rate(90.7%) of onset in age group below 10 years; mean age at clinical onset was 7.4 years; average diagnostic interval from clinical onset to diagnosis was 1.9 years. 2) The most common initial and recurrent or residual symptoms were motor deficit. 3) The most common site of occlusion or stenosis of cerebral vessel on cerebral angiography was anterior cerebral area(>97%) and the most common cerebral infarction area on brain MRI was anterior cerebral area, too. 4) The hyperventilation(for 3 minutes) on EEG were carried out in 25 patients and the prolonged build-up or rebuild-up phenomenon was observed in 13 patients(52%). 5) The prolonged build-up or rebuild-up phenomenon on EEG was observed in 6 of 15 patients who were occlusion of cerebral vessel, and in 7 of 10 patients who were stenosis of cerebral vessel on angiography. CONCLUSION: 1) The background slowings on EEG maybe suggestive of the infarction stage of Moyamoya disease in children. 2) The prolonged build-up or rebuild-up phenomenon might indicate the preinfarction stage of Moyamoya disease in children.


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